The Easybeats, Friday on My Mind (1966)

Short-lived 1960s pop group The Easybeats had their first hit with this toe-tapping ode to the great Australian traditions of slacking off, admiring pretty girls and having Friday night fun in the city.

 

 

Skyhooks, Living in the 70s (1974)

Surely a shoo-in for Eurovision, the glam rock group ticked all the boxes with their over-the-top performances, trowel-loads of make-up and campy catchy pop tunes.

 

 

Bee Gees, Staying Alive (1977)

Written for the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack, Staying Alive captures the light and shade of the 70s with its dark and rather depressing lyrics overlaid with the froth and bubble of its irresistible disco beat.

 

 

John Paul Young, Love is in the Air (1978)

Another disco classic, Love is in the Air was aimed squarely at the European market with its cheesy but hopeful lyrics, surging chorus and lump in the throat sincerity.

 

 

John Farnham, You’re the Voice (1986)

Farnsey’s rousing power ballad would have had TV viewers crooning, couch-jumping and banging out those explosive drum beats in their living rooms.

 

 

Paul Kelly, Dumb Things (1989)

If there’s anything that unites international audiences, it’s the dumb things we’ve all done. In this irresistible classic, Paul Kelly and the Coloured Girls combined impregnable lyrics and a speedy tempo with woeful resignation.

 

 

Christine Anu, My Island Home (1995)

Written about Elcho Island off Arnhem land in the Northern Territory, My Island Home captures an arm-swayingly idealistic vision of a windswept, harmonious Australia.

 

Bardot, Poison (2000)

Before X-factor and Australian Idol, there was musical reality show Popstars, which spawned the convoluted career of Sophie Monk and overplucked, over-Autotuned girl-power ballad Poison.

 

 

Kylie Minogue, Can’t Get You Out of my Head (2001)

Kylie reached peak Euro-pop heights with Can’t Get You Out of My Head, with its seductive, robotic beat, surface-skating lyrics and eminently copyable dance moves.

 

 

Delta Goodrem, Born to Try (2002)

With its soaring vocals, the heartfelt ballad written by another one-time Neighbours star captures the spirit of Eurovision and daydreams of hairbrush-clutching young girls everywhere.